Wired Stuff
WiFi Tablet Corner
My80211 White Papers (Coming Soon!)

Cisco Wireless Compatibility Matrix (Nov. 2011)

WiFi Training


 

Podcasts / Videos

My80211 Videos

Cisco: 802 11 frames with Cisco VIP George Stefanick

Fluke Networks: Minimize Wi Fi Network Downtime

Aruba: Packets never lie: An in-depth overview of 802.11 frames

ATM15 Ten Talk “Wifi drivers and devices”

Houston Methodist Innovates with Wireless Technology

Bruce Frederick Antennas (1/2)

 

Bruce Frederick dB,dBi,dBd (2/2)

Cisco AP Group Nugget

Social Links
Revolution WiFi Capacity Planner

Anchor / Office Extends Ports

 

Peek Inside Cisco's Gear

See inside Cisco's latest wireless gear!

2.4 GHz Channel Overlap

EXAMPLE 1  

EXAMPLE 2

EXAMPLE 3  

Interference Types

BLUETOOTH
 

Microwave Oven
 

Cordless Phone

JAMMER!
 

CWSP RELEASE DATE 2/08/2010
  • CWSP Certified Wireless Security Professional Official Study Guide: Exam PW0-204
    CWSP Certified Wireless Security Professional Official Study Guide: Exam PW0-204
    by David D. Coleman, David A. Westcott, Bryan E. Harkins, Shawn M. Jackman

    Shawn Jackman (Jack) CWNE#54 is a personal friend and has been a mentor to me for many years.  I've had the pleasure and opportunity to work with Jack for 4 years. Jack is a great teacher who takes complex 802.11 standards and breaks them down so almost anyone can understand the concept at hand. I'm excited for you brother. Great job and job well done! Put another notch in the belt!

IEEE 802.11a/g/n Reference Sheet

 

LWAPP QoS Packet Tagging

 

 

Saturday
Jul232011

TAC Tip: TAC Engineers Reveal Their Favorite Apps

Leeched from: https://supportforums.cisco.com/docs/DOC-15474?referring_site=facebook&channel=CiscoSupportCommunity

Smartphones have become almost ubiquitous lately. The TS Newsletter team asked the Cisco TAC what Smartphone apps they recommend to make life easier for hard working network engineers. Some apps are from Cisco, some are incredibly useful when working with Cisco gear, and others are just plain fun.

1.  Cisco Webex -  Available on iPhone, iPad, and Android, this client lets you attend meetings while on the go. Currently, the app does not work with Webex Training Center sessions due to the extra features, it is for meetings only. It’s especially nice on a large screen like the iPad.

2.  Cisco Anyconnect VPN client - Available for iPhone, and works on the iPad. It does not work on Android plans yet but stay tuned, as Cisco has announced an Android tablet for enterprises.

3.  Cisco Technical Support - This app helps Cisco customers, partners, and employees stay plugged into the Cisco Support Community (http://supportforums.cisco.com) when on the go. Stuck in a boring meeting? Waiting for a train? Use this handy app to surf the discussions within the communities, answer technical questions, and increase your online community reputation score by helping Cisco customers and partners, and adding to the community knowledge base.

In addition to forum discussions, you can also access RSS feeds, videos, and the community's leaderboards. Collaborate with other community members anytime, anywhere, by downloading this app at http://itunes.apple.com/us/app/cisco-technical-support/id398104252?mt=8. Available for iPhone today, for iPad very soon, and for Android next.

4. An SSH client - For you CLI diehards, an indispensable tool for remote administration on the go. Paid app iSSH is a top seller and well worth the money. It includes a fully featured VNC client and X11 display server, and both of these can work over SSH. There are also free SSH apps available

5. datacase - Use your phone as a ftp/tftp/http server - handy for transferring files. Connect the iPhone to a wireless network you can access from your Mac and launch DataCase. You should see your iPhone appear in the list of shared computers in the finder toolbar. Once connected, click on the volume you wish to browse, accept the connection, and use as a normal hard drive.

http://www.veiosoft.com/

6. missingcalc - The Calculator of Mac OS X has 3 modes: Basic, Scientific and Programmer. But the Calculator of iPhone/iPod touch does not have Programmer mode. The Missing Calculator app provides the Programmer's calculator. It operates on and displays 64 bits of data. Do you want to know what it exactly does? Launch the Calculator of Mac OS X in programmer's calculator mode and check it out.

http://aingoppa.egloos.com/1788948

7. Cisco App - A portal to mobile-optimized Cisco.com content, including news, new product introductions, support, videos, security alerts, partner locator, podcasts, events, and a tool to set up text messaging (SMS) alerts.

8. Cisco SIO to go- Security blog messages and customizable real time security alerts around threat outbreaks and mitigation strategies,

9. Cisco GIS Global Internet Speed test - Test Mobile Network or Wifi speed and report your results. See what kinds of speeds people geographically nearby are reporting.

10. Cisco Mobile 8.1 - Turn your iPhone into a Skinny Client talking to your Cisco Mobile-enabled Cisco Unified Communications Manager.

11. Wolfram Alpha - Instead of presenting a list of URLs (next hops) related to a subject, Wolfram Alpha presents an organized list of knowledge (answers). Do a Google search of Cisco.com and get links to our home page, certification page, tech support page, and about 515 million other links (in 0.13 seconds). Search Cisco.com on Wolfram and you will get our web hosting info, web stats, web page info, and HTML hierarchy (graphic or tabular) in an easy to read format with the ability to drill down into any topic. Originally targeted at the hard sciences and finance, it has recently started to organize knowledge in sports, music, culture and media, and weather. It’s full of crucial information (like what your name looks like as a Code 128 barcode).

12. A PDF reader that allows you to read even tiny-lettered PDFs, so you can sit back and relax while reading those project details. iRead PDF is pretty good and iBooks integrates well with iTunes but it doesn't behave very well when you want to read PDFs in partial page view or in side-by-side. ForScore is awesome in its PDF reading and annotation features but it's really meant for sheet music.

13. Dropbox - lets you wirelessly sync files onto your iDevice (like PDF files that you open in your reader). Keep in mind that the data is transmitted to a third party and they can read it if they want to, so don't put confidential files on it.

14. Get Console - Terminal emulator with accompanying console cable. Expensive, but looks cool.

http://www.mobilecrunch.com/2011/03/01/iphone-ethernet-cable-cisco-router-console/?utm_source=twitterfeed&utm_medium=twitter

15. IP6Config - Displays your assigned IPv6 address on the WiFi LAN interface (and cellular data interface if your carrier provides IPv6) and identifies local Router Advertisements. Requires iOS 4.x and later for IPv6 support.16.

Just for fun:

  • Cisco Binary Learning Game - Brush up on your binary skills so you can subnet circles around your nerdy friends.
  • iBeer and iCookies. (Props to customers with us long enough to remember the Wednesday night Beer and Cookies during Cisco training classes.)
  • Angry Birds can help you make it through those long maintenance windows.
Wednesday
Jan192011

Cisco Releases iPhone APP v1.0 for CSC (Cisco Support Community)

If you follow CSC and have an iPhone you are in luck my friend!

Cisco Support Community is a great forum and I always point folks to CSC when they have issues or if they are new to Cisco networking and want to learn.

Cisco released an iPhone app called “Cisco Technical Support”, which can be found in iTunes. I’ve used it for the first time today and I like it a lot. It keeps you connected to the forums easily.

Kudos to Dan and the other Cisco guys for making this happen!

https://supportforums.cisco.com/docs/DOC-13891

 

 

Saturday
Oct232010

PoE Power Switches (Midspans) – Inexpensive Power Management Alternative 

As a consultant, customer budgets are almost always KING. Sometimes PoE switches aren’t in the budget for the WLAN deployment. So what options do you have? 

Managed power switches, also called “midspans” have been around for a longtime. In fact they are thecost alternative to PoE switches. A Cisco PoE switch will set you back some heavy green, especially if it’s enhanced power, 802.3at. Also, customers don’t like the mess of power injectors and the lack of management. You can’t easily power cycle an access point that is hooked to an injector, which means a certain visit to the IDF closet.  

Over the years, I’ve worked with and deployed projects with PoE Power Switches / midspans. These are simple data pass through devices, similar to PoE injectors. The difference is these come in small 6 to 48 ports, 1u switches. Also, certain models are managed, which means you log into the Power Switch and simply power cycle the port.

There are a number of vendors and options when selecting a power switch. Personally, I've used and deployed Microsemi PowerDsine in a number of accounts. I also use a 9000G in my home lab.

PowerDsine has a real nice product line with a number of models and options.  They start off with the simple 1 port PoE injector to a PoE extender that pushes power and data to 200 meters! PowerDsine models provide 802.3at and 802.3af power. They also provide a Cisco “Splitter” for devices that are only Cisco PoE compatible.

These also come in handy when you need to stage a large deployment and prime your access points.

http://www.microsemi.com/powerdsine/Products/Midspan/

Tuesday
Oct192010

IPAD OTTERBOX REVIEW

After trial and error with countless  iPAD cases. The OtterBox Defender is a winner for me!

Since the purchase of my iPad a number of months ago. I’ve been testing a number of cases. I found that most cases offer little or no drop protection and the fit for most cases were OK, but not perfect.

 As an active engineer, who is one day in the office and the next day on a construction site.  I needed a case that was rugged, but yet usable and practical. Since I was already a satisfied OtterBox customer with my eariler purchase of the iPhone OtterBox. I eagerly awaited the release of the iPad cases.

OtterBox has two iPAD case offerings. They’re called the Defender and the Commuter.  After a close inspection of both cases, the Defender was my choice because of its rugged protection. 

After a few weeks of using the Defender I have to say, I am very satisfied with the OtterBox Defender case and I would recommend it.

The case is made of durable plastic with a rubber overlay that fits over the back and sides of the iPAD in typical OtterBox fashion. The iPAD power adapter section of the case slides off which allows access to the plug section. I really like this because it protects elements from getting in the adapter connection while in the field.

The side volume buttons are a perfect fit and work well. The other “ports” like the headset jack and screen lock are well protected. Another great feature is the plastic cover which also converts into an iPad desk stand. The cover fits nice over the case which protects the screen from direct hits when not in use. Also, the case adds a little weight to the iPad and its noticeable. Which I like actually.

As for drop testing. My iPad and the ground have been introduced a few times by accident. The OtterBox clearly protected my investment. The only draw back, is the cost. These cases aren’t cheap at $90.00, but it’s worth every penny!

Defender:

Drop-proof your magical, new must-have gadget with the OtterBox Defender Series for Apple® iPad™! This cutting-edge case incorporates three layers of hardcore protection plus some advanced features. Stowing your iPad away for the night or for your commute? Simply remove the back polycarbonate cover and snap it over the face for ultimate touch screen protection. The built-in stand will come in handy while trying to watch a movie or video, and creates a comfortable browsing experience. When using your iPad on a flat surface, the silicone grip pads on the bottom will hold your device securely in place. We also designed this case to accommodate the optional iPad dock accessory! Take your iPad everywhere you go knowing that it is safe from the occasional drop, bump and/or scratch.

Commuter:

The slim and attractive OtterBox Commuter Series for Apple® iPad™ is sure to protect your new toy from everyday mishaps. Enjoy full access to all buttons, ports and features, along with snap-off access for your optional iPad dock. Also included with the case is a self-adhering protective film for your touch screen to safeguard against unsightly scratches and dings. This innovative OtterBox case will increase your peace of mind while keeping your iPad as fabulous as the day you bought it! About our Commuter Series: Three slender, yet sturdy layers offer tough protection in a sleek package. With a slim form factor and smooth outer layer, this case slides easily in and out of a pocket, purse or bag.


Tuesday
Oct192010

IPAD OTTERBOX REVIEW

After trial and error with countless  iPAD cases. The OtterBox Defender is a winner for me!

Since the purchase of my iPad a number of months ago. I’ve been testing a number of cases. I found that most cases offer little or no drop protection and the fit for most cases were OK, but no perfect.

 As an active engineer, who is one day in the office and the next day on a construction site.  I needed a case that was rugged, but yet usable and practical. Since I was already a satisfied OtterBox customer with my eariler purchase of the iPhone OtterBox. I eagerly awaited the release of the iPad cases.

OtterBox has two iPAD case offerings. They’re called the Defender and the Commuter.  After a close inspection of both cases, the Defender was my choice because of its rugged protection. 

After a few weeks of using the Defender I have to say, I am very satisfied with the OtterBox Defender case and I would recommend it.

The case is made of durable plastic with a rubber overlay that fits over the back and sides of the iPAD in typical OtterBox fashion. The iPAD power adapter section of the case slides off which allows access to the plug section. I really like this because it protects elements from getting in the adapter connection while in the field.

The side volume buttons are a perfect fit and work well. The other “ports” like the headset jack and screen lock are well protected. Another great feature is the plastic cover which also converts into an iPad desk stand. The cover fits nice over the case which protects the screen from direct hits when not in use. Also, the case adds a little weight to the iPad and its noticeable. Which I like actually.

As for drop testing. My iPad and the ground have been introduced a few times by accident. The OtterBox clearly protected my investment. The only draw back, is the cost. These cases aren’t cheap at $90.00, but it’s worth every penny!

Defender:

Drop-proof your magical, new must-have gadget with the OtterBox Defender Series for Apple® iPad™! This cutting-edge case incorporates three layers of hardcore protection plus some advanced features. Stowing your iPad away for the night or for your commute? Simply remove the back polycarbonate cover and snap it over the face for ultimate touch screen protection. The built-in stand will come in handy while trying to watch a movie or video, and creates a comfortable browsing experience. When using your iPad on a flat surface, the silicone grip pads on the bottom will hold your device securely in place. We also designed this case to accommodate the optional iPad dock accessory! Take your iPad everywhere you go knowing that it is safe from the occasional drop, bump and/or scratch.

Commuter:

The slim and attractive OtterBox Commuter Series for Apple® iPad™ is sure to protect your new toy from everyday mishaps. Enjoy full access to all buttons, ports and features, along with snap-off access for your optional iPad dock. Also included with the case is a self-adhering protective film for your touch screen to safeguard against unsightly scratches and dings. This innovative OtterBox case will increase your peace of mind while keeping your iPad as fabulous as the day you bought it! About our Commuter Series: Three slender, yet sturdy layers offer tough protection in a sleek package. With a slim form factor and smooth outer layer, this case slides easily in and out of a pocket, purse or bag.


Monday
Aug302010

iPAD Whiteboard HD Review

  

I'm an iPAD junky and these apps can nickel and dime you to death! LOL 

I use my iPad mainly for reading , some tunes and the cool apps. Recently, I<<<< CLICK ME >>>> wanted to find a
 good whiteboard app. So I surfed and found most were just “finger drawing”. I also had a need for a VGA output and one that can be easy to use and looked semi professional  (for a whiteboard drawing). In my search I came across Whiteboard HD. 

Whiteboard HD allows you VGA output, ease of e-mailing and is great for collaboration.  As a network engineer we like to draw with network ICONS. Well they don’t have “network” ICONS, YET. But you can use other shapes and label for identification.  I did email support and they said network ICONs are on the way.

<<<< CLICK ME >>>>The app took a little while to get use to. But after a week I am breezing through the screens.  With any new technology you need to embrace and have an open mind.  Whiteboard HD isn’t that bad and the best I’ve found so far for my needs. Its like under $8

Here are a few examples … 

If you used a better Whiteboard app please do share ! 

Friday
Jul022010

Safari Online: CCNP Wireless IAUWS Quick Reference Available

  

CCNP IAUWS by William G. Daniel is available on Safari Online!

You can own the entire book for only 3 tokens! Great cost savings... This is a great reference book and I highly recommend it if you are going for certifications or if you are deploying a WLC.

Chapter 1. Describing Regulatory Compliance

Identifying Wireless Vulnerabilities

Industry Standards and Associations

Regulatory Compliance

Segmenting Traffic

Configuring Administrative Security

Configuring the Cisco Secure ACS for RADIUS

Authenticating Management Users on TACACS+

Configuring the Cisco Secure ACS for TACACS+

Management via Wireless

Configuring Credentials for APs

Managing WLAN Controller and Cisco WCS Alarms

Configuring WCS Logging and Message Notification

Identifying Security Audit Tools

Cisco Spectrum Expert

WCS Security Reports

PCI DSS Compliance Report

Cisco Security MARS

Chapter 2. Secure Client Devices

Configuring EAP Authentication

Understanding the Impact of Security on Application and Client Roaming

Configuring Cisco Secure Services Client (SSC)

Troubleshooting Wireless Connectivity

Chapter 3. Design and Implement Guest Access Services

Understanding Guest Access Architecture

Firewall Rules and DHCP

Configuring Foreign and Anchor Controllers

Configuring Guest Access Accounts

Troubleshooting Guest Access

Chapter 4. Design and Integrate a Wireless Network with Cisco NAC Appliance Server

Introducing the Cisco NAC Appliance Server

Configuring the Controller for Cisco NAC Out-of-Band Operations

Chapter 5. Implement Secure Wireless Connectivity Services

Configuring Authentication for the WLAN Infrastructure

Configuring Management Frame Protection

Configuring Certificate Services

Implementing Access Control Lists

Implementing Identity-Based Networking

Troubleshooting Secure Wireless Connectivity

Troubleshooting Issues Using External Tools

Chapter 6. Internal and Integrated External Security Mitigations

Mitigating Wireless Vulnerabilities

Understanding the Cisco End-to-End Security Solutions

Integrating Cisco WCS with Wireless IPS

 

Wednesday
Jun302010

Safari Online: CCNP Wireless IUWMS Quick Reference available

  

Jerome Henry's CCNP IUWMS is available on Safari Online!

You can own the entire book for only 3 tokens! Great cost savings... This is a great reference book and I highly recommend it if you are going for certifications or if you are deploying a WLC.

Chapter 1. Implement Location-Based Services

Understanding Location-Tracking Techniques

Understanding the AP/Antenna Deployment Model for Location

Tracking RFID Tags

Tracking Wireless Clients

Tracking Rogues

Chapter 2. Implement Location Architecture

Understanding Mobility Service Engine and Location Appliance Architectures

Integrating the MSE or the Location Appliance to WCS

Configuring and Tuning the MSE or the Location Appliance

Integrating Third-Party Applications

Chapter 3. Implement Advanced Services and Manage with WCS and Navigator

Configuring Controller and AP Templates

Using Config Groups

Autoprovisioning

Supporting Autonomous APs

Scheduling Wireless Access

Configuring Administrative Tasks

Configuring Administrative Access

Configuring Reports

Using WCS Navigator

Chapter 4. Design WLAN Infrastructure for Mobility

Designing the Network for High Availability

Understanding and Using Best Practices

Understanding the Implications of Layer 2 and Layer 3 Roaming

Understand Single SSID Designs with Mobility

Chapter 5. Implement and Manage the Enterprise Mesh (Indoors)

Understanding Mesh and Its Benefits

Understanding Mesh Formation

Implementing Mesh

Configuring WCS: Mesh Focus

Chapter 6. Using Advanced Troubleshooting Tools

Troubleshooting AP Joining

Troubleshooting Clients

Location Troubleshooting

Wednesday
May122010

Review: CCIE Cisco Certified Internetwork Expert Wireless Certification Exam Preparation Course in a Book for Passing the CCIE Exam

  

I completed my read of the "CCIE Cisco Certified Internetwork Expert Wireless Certification Exam Preparation Course in a Book for Passing the CCIE Exam" by William Manning

I'm surfing Amazon looking for a good read for my iPad. I stumble across this book. So, I shot a few emails to some colleagues of mine if anyone read this or knew about it before I purchased it. There weren't any reviews on Amazon for this title either. So what the heck for $16.00 let me give it a spin!

At first impression you aren't sure if this is a study guide for the lab or written or both. It turns the book is geared towards the Cisco CCIE Wireless written exam. The content itself is a mile high and a inch thick. By this I mean it covers broad topics and doesn't go into great great  detail. That's not a bad thing. Just know what to expect. 

If you are preparing for your Cisco CCIE Wireless written you may find this of interest as refresher material. Keep in mind this is NOT your 'offical' everything you need to pass guide. But rather a quick review of objectives you will find on the exam. 

Is it worth the $16.00... yea, but I wouldn't spend a penny more!

 

Sunday
Apr042010

Pineapple v2 - Jasager -- “The Yes Man” (WiFi man in the middle attack)

 

 

Robin Wood (DigiNinja) and Darren Kitchen (Hak5) collaborate on the newest Pineapple release called the WiFi Pineapple Version 2. It is running Jasger --In German it means "The Yes Man".

So what is a Pineapple you ask?

Think of a wireless router that detects probe request from clients and this wireless router responds to these probe request with a probe response allowing ALMOST anyone to attach. I see the wheels turning, right ... cool stuff but there is more!

Robin wood the author of Jasger which is installed on the Pineapple includes the linux program called "Karma". Karma is a web front end that allows you to direct traffic and allows you control of the web content.

So in short, think of man in the middle attack where people attach to you and you can filter and control their traffic and SO MUCH MORE. 

You can purchase one already pre-built for $109. 

http://www.hak5.org/store/wifi-pineapple-version-2

 

Leeched: http://www.digininja.org/jasager/ 

Jasager

Welcome to Jasager - Karma on the Fon.

Jasager is an implementation of Karma designed to run on OpenWrt on the Fon. It will probably run on most APs with Atheros wifi cards but it was designed with the Fon in mind as it is a nice small AP which gives it a lot of scope for use in penetration tests and other related fun.

A quick highlight of features:

  • Web interface showing currently connected clients with their MAC address, IP address (if assigned) and the SSID they associated with
  • The web interface allows control of all Karma features and can either run fully featured through AJAX enabled browsers or just as well through lynx
  • Auto-run scripts on both association and IP assignment
  • Full logging for later review
  • Pluggable module system for easy extensibility
  • Basic command line interface so you don't have to remember the different iwpriv commands

Please give your feedback, bug reports, comments, praise, etc either throughjasager@digininja.org or on the Hak5 forums.

To pre-empt the question of "Will this work on a laptop instead?", with some slight tweeking it should do but I haven't tested this for two reasons. First, from a security point of view, the web server needs to have some way to execute the iw and if commands. On the Fon everything runs as root by default so this doesn't really create any extra problems on top of what is already there but on a laptop it could be an issue. The second reason is because I have plans for a laptop version which will build on this and run in a much better way due to the extra processor/storage space.

I've recently worked with Orange from the Piranha project to integrate Jasager into his firmware. Together, but mostly Orange, we worked out how to make a Jasager Makefile so it could be built directly into the firmware and as a proper OpenWrt package rather than my original script which built the package with tar and gzip.

Uses

As with any tools, this tool can be used for good or bad. Here are some of the good uses:

  • In your office - Set it up to capture laptops before the bad guys do. Use a website to remind them of the rules.
  • On penetration tests - Lure in target clients to find a back door into networks
  • At home - Have fun with neighbours who try to steal your wifi bandwidth 

Saturday
Apr032010

Cisco Valet - Home Wireless

 

 

Cisco released a new product line called Valet Wireless Hot Spot this week. This is marketing to home users. It has parental controls, managed guest access and allows for easy configuration. It is also delivering 2x2 N. 

I ordered one to do some testing. The ol' lady doesn't like to be on my LAB wireless anyway as I ticker with it to much.  I'll post my evaluation once I'm done. Here is the specs:

There are (2) Models the Valet and Valet PLUS.

http://home.cisco.com/en-us/wireless/valet/

Model: Valet (M10)
Technology: Wireless-N
Bands: 2.4 GHz
Transmit / receive: 2 x 2
Antennas: Internal
Ethernet ports x speed: 4 x 10/100
Software setup: Easy Setup Key
Safer surfing: Yes
Parental controls: Duration Access Controls
Specific Domain Blocking
Child / Teen Website Filtering
Customer service: 24/7 Award-Winning phone and customer support
Warranty: 1 year hardware limited warranty

 

 

Model: Valet Plus (M20)
Technology: Wireless-N
Bands: 2.4 GHz
Transmit / receive: 2 x 2
Antennas: Internal
Ethernet ports x speed: 4 x Gigabit
Software setup: Easy Setup Key
Safer surfing: Yes
Parental controls: Duration Access Controls
Specific Domain Blocking
Child / Teen Website Filtering
Customer service: 24/7 Award-Winning phone and customer support
Warranty:

1 year hardware limited warranty

 

 

 

Wednesday
Feb172010

Meraki Virtual Stumbler

 

 

This is the first virtual Stumber of it's kind and you don’t have to be connected to the internet for it to work either (FireFox ONLY!). I had a friend call me this evening with a wireless issue and he didn’t have a wifi scanner installed. This is the next best thing! NO APPS OR DRIVERS TO INSTALL!

This virtual stumbler fits the bill for residential and hobbyist wireless users alike! And the price, its right, FREE! So how does it work you ask? Simply visit http://tools.meraki.com/stumbler and it will use your existing wireless card to scan the environment. No applications or drivers to install -- at all "SWEEEEET".

Q: What is the WiFi Stumbler?

A: The WiFi Stumbler is a browser-based wireless scanner tool that detects 802.11 wireless networks and displays useful information about the networks in an easily searchable, intuitive web interface. WiFi Stumbler can be used to optimize wireless network coverage, troubleshoot performance issues, detect rogue APs and perform basic pre-deployment site surveys.

Q: Can I use WiFI Stumbler when I am not connected to the Internet?

A: If your browser supports offline mode (currently only Firefox), then it can load WiFi Stumbler from its offline cache. This means that WiFi Stumbler will work in these browsers even when you are not connected to the Internet, as long as your wireless card is enabled. Simply visit the Stumbler page using Firefox once you are connected to the Internet. The site will ask for permission to use offline storage. Grant this permission, bookmark the page and you can revisit whenever you need to use WiFi Stumbler.

Q: How does the WiFi Stumbler work?

A: WiFi Stumbler captures data about nearby wireless networks from your computer's wireless card and displays it as a web page. It can even work when you are not connected to the Internet if your browser supports offline mode (currently Firefox only).

Q: Why is Stumbler a web-based tool instead of standalone, downloadable software?

A: By running in a browser, there is no need to download software to your computer. This makes it very easy to load and use since no software installation is required. It also can run on either a PC or Mac, unlike most downloadable software applications. In addition, as we will be continually adding new features to Stumbler, you will automatically get the latest version of the tool each time you reload the page.

Q: The WiFi Stumbler doesn't load on my computer/in my browser. Why not?

A: WiFi Stumbler requires Java support and does not currently support Linux. If your browser does not support Java or you are running Linux and you try to load WiFi Stumbler, you will receive an error message in your browser window. Currently, Google Chrome for Mac does not support Java so it will not run WiFi Stumbler. WiFi Stumbler is also currently a beta stage tool; if you encounter other problems getting Stumbler to load, please let us know using the Make a Wish box at the bottom of the page.

Q: Why do some networks appear in gray and others are in dark gray?

A: Networks appearing in light gray were not detected in the latest scan but were detected recently. The last time a network was detected by Stumbler will appear under the "Last Seen" column. If an access point stops broadcasting its SSID (eg. it was unplugged) or local RF interference or environmental obstructions prevent broadcast beacons from reaching your client then the network might "disappear" for a few seconds, in which case it would turn light gray until it is picked up in another scan.

Q: Why don't all of my network broadcast SSIDs appear in the Network List?

A: If an SSID is broadcasting in 5 GHz only and the wireless card in the client on which you are running Stumbler on does not support 5 GHz then the SSID will not appear in the Network List.

Q: What does "Hidden" mean under BSSID name?

A: If a network owner has disabled SSID broadcasting on their network, then the SSID is now "hidden". What that means is that the SSID name is no longer included in the the periodic broadcast beacons from the access point that alert local clients to the network. This is sometimes done as a security measure, as only clients that know the name of the network (or who use "sniffer" software programs) can associate to the network.

Q: Why does the same SSID appear twice with different MAC addresses?

A: If there are multiple access points in a network all broadcasting the same SSID, each AP will appear individually in WiFi Stumbler showing the same SSID. Also, if an access point contains multiple radios that are broadcasting the same SSID, each radio will appear individually in the WiFi Stumbler network list.

http://tools.meraki.com/stumbler

Monday
Feb082010

CWSP Certified Wireless Security Professional Official Study Guide: Exam PW0-204 RELEASED!

 

 

The new Certified Wireless Security Professional Official Study Guide was released today! If you are looking to brush up on your 802.11 skill set or perhaps you want to pursue the CWSP certification this read is a MUST HAVE in your arsenal of reading!! 

The CWSP PW0-204 is authored by: David D. Coleman (Author), David A. Westcott (Author), Bryan E. Harkins (Author), Shawn M. Jackman (Author). This is an author list of who is who in 802.11 and sure not to disappoint. 

I've had the pleasure to work with Shawn Jackman. You wouldn't find a better teacher, mentor and 802.11 expert in the industry today! 

 

Sunday
Jan312010

Airmagnet / Fluke SpectrumXT

 

 

If you've been under a rock or locked at the office then you may have missed the new Spectrum announcment offering from Airmagnet / Fluke. Its called the SpectrumXT.  I've always said, "An engineer without a spectrum card, is a carpenter without his hammer" - George Stefanick

Spectrum cards are $$$ and are often out of reach of some folks. AirMagnet made an early attempt with the Intel 5300 spectrum offering. I wasn't really a big fan of this offering, but customers who had a price point seen this as an attractive alternative to the higher price Cisco / Cognio offering. 
 
I haven't personally tested the SpectrumXT yet; I did say YET! But i already like the form factor, USB. If you haven't noticed PCs are being manufactured without PCMCIA slots making the Cognio offering a bit challenging to work with. Of course you can purchase the extension, but its pretty darn ugly and hangs like 10 feet out from your PC just waiting for something to hit your $3,000 card! 

And as you would expect, SpectrumXT integrates into Survey PRO and WiFi Analyzer PRO.
Early reviews from industry experts are favoring the SpectrumXT. 
 
Thursday
Jan212010

IKEA - LACKRack (DATA RACK)

 

 

Interesting product by IKEA. I like it ... If your a geek like me and need to make a fashion statement or maybe you are looking for an inexpensive rack solution here it is -- LACKRack. Ill be checking out my local IKEA next week to see what the LACKRack has in store for me...

Looking to build a home data center? Look no further than you local IKEA store. Computer hobbyists are adapting the Swedish furniture chain’s LACK side table to house servers and switches, creating a LACKRack. It turns out that the space between the table’s legs is 19 inches, the same width as a

 standard slot in a data center server rack.

The LACKRack was first displayed at the eth0 Winter 2010 computer conference last weekend in Wieringerwerf, the Netherlands. The eth0 team has posted a guide to building your own unit by using wood screws to affix server rack mounts to the legs of the table. The tables are stackable and modular, so can be assembled in a variety of configurations. 
There’s also the LACKRack “Enterprise Edition,” which uses a longer LACK coffee table – and as  with any enterprise product, has a premium price as a result. The eth0 site suggests that Google engineers may have been the first to affix gear to LACK tables. 

Looking to build a home data center?

Look no further than you local IKEA store. Computer hobbyists are adapting the Swedish furniture chain’s LACK side table to house servers and switches, creating a LACKRack. It turns out that the space between the table’s legs is 19 inches, the same width as a standard slot in a data center server rack.

The LACKRack was first displayed at the eth0 Winter 2010 computer conference last weekend in Wieringerwerf, the Netherlands. The eth0 team has posted a guide to building your own unit by using wood screws to affix server rack mounts to the legs of the table. The tables are stackable and modular, so can be assembled in a variety of configurations.


There’s also the LACKRack “Enterprise Edition,” which uses a longer LACK coffee table – and as  with any enterprise product, has a premium price as a result. The eth0 site suggests that Google engineers may have been the first to affix gear to LACK tables.

 

 

 

Saturday
Jan092010

Airnergy WiFi power system gives RCA a reason to exist (video)

 

 

Has anyone heard about this new device that charges battery's from WiFi signals? I am really interested to hear how this works? If this is indeed real, this takes the prize for best technology innovation of the decade in my book..  Check it out, what do you think..

We don't usually associate RCA with new and innovative technologies, but we think know they're on to something with its Airnergy power system, which harvests energy from WiFi signals. Shipping this summer, the pocketable dongle picks up WiFi signals from the air and manages to charge an internal battery through some magic inside. You don't have to connect to a network, you just have to be in a place that has signal, and it will automatically charge up. As if we weren't intrigued already, they told us that they're planning on building the tech into actual cellphone batteries, so you would theoretically never need to plug in again and your device would always be topped off. Yeah, we want.

 

We don't usually associate RCA with new and innovative technologies, but we think know they're on to something with its Airnergy power system, which harvests energy from WiFi signals. Shipping this summer, the pocketable dongle picks up WiFi signals from the air and manages to charge an internal battery through some magic inside. You don't have to connect to a network, you just have to be in a place that has signal, and it will automatically charge up. As if we weren't intrigued already, they told us that they're planning on building the tech into actual cellphone batteries, so you would theoretically never need to plug in again and your device would always be topped off. Yeah, we want.

Here is the video link: http://www.viddler.com/explore/engadget/videos/1001/ 

Leeched: http://www.engadget.com 

 

 

Monday
Jan042010

IPhone APP: IPhone Network Sniffer

Once the issues are ironed out, this could be a handy tool in the hands of a hacker. I may just have to jailbreak my iPhone.

Pirni is the worlds first native network sniffer for iPhone. The iPhone's Wi-Fi has some major drawbacks in its hardware design, thus we can not properly set the device in promiscuous mode.

This is why Pirni comes with an ARP spoofer that successfully routes all the network traffic through your device and then uses packet forwarding to send it to it's normal recipient (ie. the router).

After a successful network sniffing, you can transfer the dumpfile to your computer and open it up with Wireshark (or any other traffic analyzer that supports pcap) to analyze the traffic.

BPF filters allow you to select which packets to be dumped. This allows you to "filter" packets, so that only "interesting" packets can be supplied to the software using BPF; this can avoid copying "uninteresting" packets from the operating system kernel to software running in user mode, reducing the CPU requirement to capture packets and the buffer space required to avoid dropping packets.

 

leeched from: www.net-security.org

Sunday
Dec202009

IPhone APP: dot11wavelength

I stumbled across an interesting IPhone app called dot11wavelength by The Perseus Group @ www.wirelessfabric.com. This app displays the on channel frequencies for the different 802.11a (5GHz) and 802.11g (2.4GHz) channels.

This app is helpful if you need the exact frequency for a channel in the field or if you are studying for your CWNA exam. They just updated the APP to include other country channel frequencies (JP,ES,IT, DE and FR).

 

 

Monday
Dec072009

IPhone App: WiFi Scanner ~ WiFiFoFum 

I tried a few of the IPhone WiFi scanners, nothing to write home to mom about. Until I tried WiFiFoFum scanner. It reminds me of Netstumber from back in the day, but with the GPS option. This scanner not only scans for WiFi networks, but it also records the location via GPS for later review. It records the data in a KML file that you can email yourself and drop into google maps or review right from your IPhone.

There are 4 radio buttons:

Networks - This button displays the basics ~ SSID, mac address, RSSI, data rates and if the network is secure.

Radar - Pretty useless. It gives you a visual of how close you are. If you are in the crosshairs you are on the money.

Logging - The logging function is pretty cool. When you enable logging it will record your position when your IPhone heard the access point. Once you stop the logging it records your data in a file with the date and time. You click on that file and a google map pops up showing you the access points it found. You can also send yourself the file, its in a KML file.

Settings - The last button is the settings button. All the basic here, scan rate, RSSI filter, etc.

 

Sunday
Nov292009

Web Power Switch II

The name is a bit misleading, it not a switch really, well kind of, but not the switch you are thinking of. I was looking for an inexpensive power management solution to control the various components in the lab. Electric is pretty expensive here in Houston and having a rack full of equipment doing nothing when not is use is just a waste of money. I looked at other remote power solutions but price was a hugh factor in my decision making process. I discovered remote power management isn’t cheap! I saw solutions in the hundreds and even in the thousand dollar range.  I also didn’t want to compromise reliability and usability either over a cheap solution.

After much surfing, reading and research I decided on Digital Loggers (www.webpowerswitch.com) Web Power Switch II. I have to say, it’s not the prettiest thing and it’s not rack mountable 1u form.  They do sell a rack mount kit but I didn’t purchase it, it just didn’t look right. Outside of those two draw backs I am really pleased with the performance for the price. For starters it was only $135.00 with shipping.  My order shipped the next day after placing the order. The plug is a 15 amp connector and comes with 8 ports that allow for remote management and 2 additional power ports that are "unswitched" or unmanaged.

The web interface is pretty basic. You can configure and name each outlet for easier identification when managing what devices you want to turn on or off. Comes with a basic syslog which reports the status of the power switch and any changes. Get this, it has an auto ping feature that will automatically power reset an outlet if it loses connectivity with a device. Outside of it being an ugly duckling I'm more then satisfied